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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
, and dealing with assistance to those in america, the richest country on the face of the earth, who are going hungry, a large number of whom are children who live in america. the committee on agriculture passed out a bipartisan bill in the last congress and it was never brought before my republican friends. this year the committee also passed out a bipartisan bill that was brought to this floor. it could have and should have been passed with a bipartisan vote. not because i agreed with all of it, but because it was appropriate to have a bill to go to conference with on this important subject. our republican friends added three amendments which we harmful to clearly those in need in america. as a result, we didn't vote for it, but that's not why it failed, mr. speaker. it failed because 62 republicans voted against the bill reported out with every republican voting in committee for it. one was mr. lucas, the chairman of the committee observed, it apparently wasn't good enough for those 62 republicans. compromise seems very difficult for some people in this house. but i again remind us all it
to see how far our labor stand has fallen behind other countries. i want america to be number one, not number one in foreign countries occupied or number one in number of people incarcerated. i want america to be number one in wages. i want america to be number one in benefits. i want america to be number one in healthcare. in australia, they have a $16 an hour minimum wage. in germany, people routinely, as a matter of law get up to six weeks off each year and they get 44 days of paid sick leave. germany is not impoverished by that. they're strengthened. we need to make the same sort of steps here in america to improve the working conditions of the people who work. >> john: i think germany providing their version of medicare for everyone who makes under $100,000 has something to do with that of course. >> germany has had universal healthcare for a century. we're still arguing about it here in the united states. >> john: 100 years after teddy roosevelt ran for it on the progressive ticket. >> that's right. >> john: pushback is the only thing we're getting from our republican friend
" special investigation, the truth about benghazi. for nearly a year, america has been searching for answers about the deadly attacks that took the lives of four americans, including ambassador christopher stevens, information officer sean smith and two former navy s.e.a.l.s. that search for answers could not be any more relevant than tonight, as u.s. embassies and consulates around the world are closed or on high alert. prevents another attack means getting to the truth of what happened there. we go back to benghazi of where it all began to investigate why all the attacks happened. plus, john king gets to the bottom of the talking points and the evolving story coming out of washington in the days and weeks after the attacks. to presidential politics lead to a coverup? and what did the families of the four lost americans want most? you'll hear from them directly. but first, we go back to the hours before the attack. september 11. in america, a day of solemn remembrance. in 2012, a day of violence in the middle east. demonstrators storm the u.s. embassy in cairo, angry over a low-rent film ma
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
. america live starts right now. >> starting with the fox news alert. a big opening blast on what is described as the potential coming war over who gets to vote. welcome everybody to america live and so there are debates breaking out over how our elections should be held and what rules will be in place when it comes to voting. the issue erupted after the supreme court went down and that gave a bit more power to set their own rules on these things and that ruling sparked protest and drew sharp criticism from the justice department and former secretary of state addressed the issue at an event that many will be a 2016 presidential run for her. >> we have seen a sweeping effort in our country to obstruct new obstacles to voting. under cover and addressing election fraud. in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights are introduced in 31 states. not every obstacle is to race. but those who say racial is not a problem in the election must not be paying attention. >> that is from hillary clinton. >> our host of power play. chris. chris, is this the makings of a battle tha
or bad. yes, the long-term concern is there. if the papers go away america will be in very serious trouble because when you get down to it the television reporters are , what that one guy said, they are lap poodles. it is basically nothing more than lap pools for house members here in phoenix. you just do not know what is going on in washington from the electronic media at all. for the callou this morning. on that subject that you talked about on the future of newspapers and specifically what might happen with "the washington post," and this bezos -- by jeff might've contributed to part the sale. here's a bit of what he said. [video clip] was latemily was in -- in adopting a payroll product, which most of the major market has already started doing. the fact that they could've started that years ago, the way the financial times or the wall street journal had done years ago, i think maybe that certainly hastens their financial difficulties, that they were so late to doing a pay wall. politico is a block in bc. they have a high tier subscription product, which seems to be doing very w
something and they're upset. do you really think that me being here in front of 1500 people, that america is going to wake up tomorrow and change? >> john: lewis, i want to thank you for joining us on the final week of "viewpoint." we're going to have you on the clip tomorrow as well. you've inspired me and other comedians for such a long time. and more important after inspiring me you really make me laugh. it's a gift to have you here. stick around. while we might cover the news, up next we're joined by a peabody award winning not fake news line, the one and own brian lair. lewis black, everyone. [applause] >> ... and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there is wiggle room in the ten commandments is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. >> ya, i consider you jew-talian. >> okay, whatever you want. >> who plays kafka? >> who saw kafka? >> who ever saw kafka? >> (laughter). >> asking the tough questions. >> chris brown, i mean you wouldn't let one of your daughters go out with him. >> absolutely not. >> you would rather deal with ahmadinejad then me? >> absolutely! >> (singing) >> i
pushing to make high-quality preschool available for every four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ to take skincare to the next level you're ready for roc® new roc® multi correxion has an exclusive 5 in 1 formula it's clinically proven to hydrate dr
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
'm gregg jarrett. welcome to america news headquarters. >> heather: i'm heather childers. the taxman has been served. chairman investigating the irs scandal serves subpoenas to the treasury department to hand over more documents. we'll have the latest,. >> gregg: hundreds of spectators getting up early to see this controlled plant implosion when something goes horribly wrong
. and people all over america are experiencing in the mail every day sticker shock over their premiums and now, the internet is more organized and sophisticated to get out that anger in large numbers, don't you think? >> there is certainly anger and you will so insurance companies, u.s. chamber of commerce, get out there and sell a message that the sales tax on health care insurance will hurt consume sxers then the president and his organization trying to push people to enroll in to this to make the argument to help folks. but remember, there is not a bill hang negligent balance here and as much as the house tried to repeal all or part was health care reform. >> it is delay and so forth. but let me move on to immigration and what people refer to as amnesty. one group in particular that is fighting against amnesty and they have organized 58,000 people to either get out on the streets in protest or contact their congressman at their home offices. they know where they live in the home districts. what did that immigration? >> on immigration, you will have both sides gearing up here. folks that are
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
new plans to overhaul america's mortgage system today. he's going to propose shutting down government-backed lenders fannie mae and freddie mac, plus, he wants to boost the number of 30-year mortgages in this market hoping it will make loans more accessible to more people so they can fulfill the american dream. carl cameron has more from washington. so a lot of proposals, carl. we're not sure exactly what will become of them, but what is the president proposing today in. >> reporter: well, he wants to strengthen the housing market by making 30-year mortgages more available, and one of the ways would be to do away with fannie mae and freddie mac and institute more capital into mortgage lending. shaun donovan is the president's hud secretary, the secretary of housing and urban development. he's how he put it this morning. >> we also have to make sure we never go back to a system that takes trillions of dollars in housing wealth away from families that can crash the spire world economy. so -- the entire world economy. so a big focus is how do we build a safe, stable housing finance syste
not? >> got to go in. >> come on rob, get it in there to get three points. >> one point. >> america is still learning the beautiful game. >> that will help. >> coming up next, economist dr. jeffe jeffery sacks joins us and bill bratton and nbc political director chuck todd. >> chuck winked at you. >> oh, god. >> wink again. >> the winker. >> he just did. >> and, of course, the great andrea mitchell. >> she's great. >> "morning joe" back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for
driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> fox news >>> fox news alert, it is over. hannah anderson is safe, and james lee dimaggio the man accused of snatching her is shot dead by an fbi sniper. jonathan gilliam is in the studio with me as we get calls from the family and others throughout the west coast, and jonathan here in new york with me. now, you were saying that the team is the same team that took down the boston marathoner, or involved in the boston marathon investigation and sounds like one shooter. what do you think? describe the scene in idaho as you perceive it? >> from what we know a helicopter out there and spotters in the helicopter, and snipers as well, but they weren't that far in the woods so maybe they were guiding a team in or maybe a shot from the hill, and they had the capabilities of doing both. >> they had the capability of taking him out or from the chopper, but you think that the shots came from the ground? >> i don't know, g
in america." the pendulum is swinging in the republican party now. as the party moves hard right, will they really try another establishment time like romney or dole or mccain or christie or jeb bush? or will the party go for one of its tea party heroes like rand paul? here with me now is the author of the great book "collision 2016." dan, let's talk about what you call the subterranean campaign of 2012 and what it offers us in the future. >> we think of the campaign as the campaign we all cover all the time. everything we talk about, every utterance, every gaffe, every debate, every movement. and that's part of politics and in many ways the interesting and enjoyable part of politics, but it's not necessarily the decisive part of politics. there are important and powerful underlying forces that effect every campaign. in 2012, one was the economy. would it be just good enough to allow president obama to win re-election or bad enough to deny re-election. another was voter anger. which direction would it go? a third was the deep red/blue divide and how that shaped attitudes beyond w
. thank you and god bless america. >> i think we go we go inside ? >> we have a signing station set in the air conditioning. >> it's in air conditioning. >> those of us in wool are looking forward to the air conditioning. >> you do that. you're the boss. i'm just the passenger. college is nice, isn't it? >> we will take a moment and get ourselves oriented. we are leaving downtown gettysburg. the train will be moving in a westerly direction. >> does this train go parallel to the route that he came down or hill came down? i think so. you may want to get on and explain that at some point or have bill do it. you do have a narration? you may want to have somebody actually do the narration if that makes sense. >> it was just over that hill where the fighting took place very early in the morning july 1, 1863. >> i think either you or bill should give the narration. bill knows vastly more about the details than i do. but it's your train. i will say something general. >> walk through the park. hi, how are you? good. aren't you wa-good. aren't you warm? >> very warm, sir. >> saw you on bill o
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)